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MIDA/ENIS Spring School 2020

École d'été - Lundi 2 mars 2020 - 09:00   A new development came that drives us to CANCEL (or postpone) MIDA-ENIS Spring School in Catania from March 2 to 7The Rector of the University of Catania has decided yesterday to cancel all activities in the University and to POSTPONE  the conferences that were planned.  The Innovative Training Network “Mediating Islam in the Digital Age” (MIDA) and the European Network for Islamic Studies (ENIS) organise the MIDA/ENIS Spring School 2020 "Contesting authority: knowledge, power and expressions of selfhood"Date: Monday 2nd - 8th of March 2020Venue: Catania, SicilyPremises: Università degli Studi di Catania, Palazzo Pedagaggi, Via Vittorio Emanuele II 49, 95131 Catania, Sicily (Italy)Theme: "Contesting authority: knowledge, power and expressions of selfhood"The ENIS Spring School 2020 addresses two closely interrelated aspects of Islam in the digital age. Firstly, how (past and contemporary) technological revolutions have informed the performance of selfhood (including gender), the modes of engagement with society, and the political consequences of shifting boundaries between public and private spheres. Secondly, it addresses the construction and transformation of religious authority and religious knowledge production, and concomitant questions of legitimacy, power and discipline, under changing circumstances.Presently there is a mushrooming of YouTube channels presenting testimonials and life accounts, face book pages providing space for minority groups (e.g. homosexuals or ex-Muslims) that publicise previous hidden aspects of identity, as well as blogs and homemade videos communicating everyday life events or short clips showing artistic performance in an affordable non-celebrity style sharing them with a wide audience. Quite often they contain an (implicit) political statement about the societies in which the expressions are uttered, not only in the message but also in the mere fact of the utterance.(Young) people in the Muslim world, like elsewhere, share more and more aspects of self, including more intimate and previously hidden ones, or experiences with ‘illegality’. These new digital forms of self-expression also entail a claim to space for individualised selfhood. Out of sight of different regimes of surveillance, forms of marginality, secret lives and intimate experiences take on a more public form. With that it questions dominant forms of authority, whether parental, communal, religious or political. The Muslim / Arab world is usually characterised as stressing communal or relational forms of identities and putting less emphasis on individualised selfhood in comparison to the West. The Arab Uprisings first seemed to overturn some deeply rooted forms of authority, including with respect to political power, but now long-established authoritarian forms of power with their different nuances appear to be square back. Yet several observers notice a ‘silent revolution’ taking place on an individual level, asserting individual selfhood and rights. Do these new forms of self-narratives and artistic performances offer us insight into the development of new forms of selfhood?  What are the most important characteristics and expressive forms of these new forms of selfhood? What are the potential political consequences of new forms of self-understanding and expression?Issues of selfhood and artistic performance are closely linked to questions of legitimacy, power and discipline. Muslims have held varying, sometimes conflicting, views on the extent to which knowledge and authority are exclusive of a single figure, a masculine ‘professional’ group, or distributed in society, how knowledge should be transmitted and controlled, and the literary forms that it should take, and how it should be reproduced.The widely held assumption that in the pre-digital era Islamic reasoning was a collective matter of established scholars and theology-centred argumentation lacks historical pedigree. The individual as a political subject emerged centuries before the dawn of digital technology. This also questions the assumption that religious authority was uncontested, only to be challenged very recently by the same technological innovations. Questioning ‘established’ religious authorities and addressing new audiences is as old as Islam. The invention of paper, the rise of literacy and the emergence of ‘calligraphic states’, and not least the spread of print technology have had profound influence on authority and knowledge production, but also generated new expressions of selfhood. Digitisation has intensified this process in an unprecedented way, resulting in the rise of new intellectuals, the feminisation of contestation, the ‘democratisation’ of knowledge production, the emergence of new audiences and discursive communities, the relocation, subjectivation, and fragmentation of authority, but also in new forms of community building, online and offline. Finally, digitisation also prompted ‘established’ religious authorities to reflect upon these newly arising challenges and how to effectively cope with them.The program of this event will be available by the end of February on this webpage  Scientific CommitteeProf. Pascal Buresi (CNRS, EHESS-IISMM)Prof. Albrecht Fuess (CNMS/Marburg University)Dr. Jens Heibach (German Institute of Global and Areas Studies, and Marburg University)Prof. Christian Lange (Director NISIS) Dr. Pénélope Larzillière (IRD)Prof. Daniela Melfa (SeSaMO President, University of Catania)Maike Neufend (CNMS/University of Marburg) Prof. Karin van Nieuwkerk (Radboud University Nijmegen) Prof. Thijl Sunier (Stichting VU) Prof. Gerard Wiegers (UvA) OrganisationThe organisation of the MIDA/ENIS Spring School is a joint effort by the Innovative Training Network Mediating Islam in the Digital Age (ITN-MIDA), this project has received the European union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement N°813547 ; the European Network for Islamic Studies (ENIS) which includes the Italian Society for Middle Eastern Studies (SeSaMO), the Centre for Near and Middle Eastern Studies / Centrum für Nah-und Mittelost-Studien (CNMS), University of Marburg, the Institut d’études de l’Islam et des Sociétés du Monde Musulman (IISMM, UMS 2000, CNRS-EHESS), the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) and Freie Universität Berlin and the University of Catania. 

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Conférence publique de l'IISMM

Conférence - Mardi 3 mars 2020 - 18:30Conférence publique de l'IISMM - Cycle 2019-2020L'ISLAM DANS LES MONDIALISATIONS  Mardi 3 mars 2020 de 18h30 à 20H30 - EHESS, Amphithéâtre F. Furet, 105, bd Raspail 75006 Entrée libre sans inscription au préalable RÉBELLIONS, RÉVOLTES ET RÉVOLUTIONSSarah Ben Néfissa (IRD-IEDES)« Printemps arabes, islamismes et crise du langage politique »  

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Conférence publique de l'IISMM

Conférence - Mardi 4 février 2020 - 18:30Conférence publique de l'IISMM - Cycle 2019-2020L'ISLAM DANS LES MONDIALISATIONS  Mardi 4 février 2020 de 18h30 à 20H30 - EHESS, Amphithéâtre François Furet, 105, boulevard Raspail 75006 Entrée libre sans inscription au préalable TRAVAIL ET MONDIALISATIONS DISCRÈTESOlivier Pliez, Géographe, Directeur de recherche, CNRS, ART-Dev,« Se restaurer à Yiwu (Chine), les restaurants musulmans comme ancrages de la mondialisation » Assaf Dahdah, Géographe, Chargé de recherche, CNRS, ART-Dev, TELEMMe« Migrer, travailler et habiter à Beyrouth : la capitale libanaise à travers la main-d’œuvre étrangère »

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Prix de thèse Moyen-Orient et mondes musulmans 2020

Appels étudiants - Vendredi 10 janvier 2020 - 22:00Le GIS Moyen-Orient et mondes musulmans et l’Institut d’étude de l’Islam et des sociétés du monde musulman (IISMM, UMS 2000) organisent en 2020 la septième édition du Prix de thèse Moyen-Orient et mondes musulmans. Sont éligibles des travaux soutenus en français ou en France entre le 1er septembre 2017 et le 31 décembre 2019, dans toutes les disciplines des lettres et sciences humaines et sociales.Plusieurs prix seront attribués et remis solennellement à la fin de l’année académique 2019-2020 :Les prix généraux du GIS et de l’IISMM, récompensant des travaux remarquables dans toutes les disciplines SHS et pour toutes les aires (Maghreb, Moyen-Orient mondes musulmans)Le prix Mohammed Arkoun de la meilleure thèse en islamologie, organisé avec le soutien du Bureau Central des Cultes (BCC-Direction des Libertés Publiques et des Affaires Juridiques), ministère de l’Intérieur, et du ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche et de l’Innovation.Le prix de la meilleure thèse francophone sur le Moyen-Orient et les mondes musulmans, organisé avec le soutien de la Direction régionale de l’AUF au Moyen-Orient.Conditions générales de candidature :Avoir soutenu entre le 1erseptembre 2017 et le 31 décembre 2019 une thèse en français ou en France sur le Moyen-Orient et les mondes musulmans en lettres et sciences humaines et sociales (pour les prix généraux) ouAvoir obtenu les félicitations du jury (dans les universités où cela se pratique).Avoir envoyé un dossier complet au GIS Moyen-Orient et mondes musulmans selon les modalités ci-dessous, au plus tard le vendredi 10 janvier 2020.Conditions particulières pour le prix de l’AUF :Le candidat, citoyen d’un des treize pays couverts par la Direction régionale de l’AUF au Moyen-Orient, doit avoir soutenu sa thèse en français, soit dans son pays, soit en France même, dans les délais et dans les disciplines indiquées ci-dessus.Composition du dossier :Un exemplaire électronique de la thèse au format PDF.Un exemplaire du rapport du jury en format PDF. Pour les universités étrangères où il n’existe pas de rapport, prière de joindre deux lettres de recommandation : la première du directeur de thèse, la seconde d’un autre universitaire.Un CV et une liste des publications en format PDF.NB : Si le rapport n’est pas disponible le 10 janvier 2020, il est possible de le faire parvenir ensuite.Dossier à envoyer par e-mail (thèse en PDF, rapport de soutenance, CV) : prix.momm[at]gmail.com et direction.gis[at]ehess.fr

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Towards a New Social History of Sudan

Colloque - Mardi 10 décembre 2019 - 09:00The historiography of modern and contemporary Sudan has been shaped by its political history. Indeed, historians have often been called upon to respond to contemporary crises – civil wars, regime changes, international conflicts – often according to criteria of urgency, at the risk of falling into a certain presentism. In this context, social history, which often requires a slower and punctilious form of research, which does not produce ready-made solutions to the multiple crises in the country, and which put at the centre stage the lives of “ordinary people” has struggled to assert itself on the academic scene.This conference, which is also a research program, aims to put "ordinary people", women and men, back at the center of Sudan's modern and contemporary history. From the outset, we wish to emphasize that the term "ordinary people" should neither hide nor flatten the teeming complexity of Sudanese society. We also wish to consider all the dimensions related to the history of "exceptionally normal" people: their daily lives, beliefs, horizons and desires, their interconnections and circulations, while never forgetting the diversity of the various actors, be it related to their social class or their origin.Taking the social history of "ordinary people", including those of the marginalized peripheries, as a starting point for historical research opens up new perspectives, not only on the political history of the country, but also on the changes, breaks and crises that the country has gone through. This includes the understanding of great popular revolutionary episodes that have been pivotal for its history, such as the one that has been taking place since December 2018 and brought the end of Omar al-Bashir's regime (1989-2019).Organisation: The University of Chicago Center in ParisSponsoring institutions: IMAF, Paris 1, AUF, IISMM, ANR SyndiQuAf, IRD, CEDEJ KhartoumREGISTER HERE

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Conférence publique de l'IISMM

Conférence - Mardi 7 janvier 2020 - 18:30Attention le lieu de la conférence publique de l'IISMM change exceptionnellement :  la conférence aura lieu à l'Auditorium du Pôle des langues et civilisations65 rue des grands moulinsn 75013 ParisLe 7 janvier 2020 de 18H30 à 20H30 - Entrée libre sans inscription au préalableConférence publique du Cycle "l'Islam dans les mondialisations" sur le thème "Entre le local et l'universel "Olivier Roy, Politologue, Professeur, Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, European University Institute « La reformulation du religieux dans la globalisation : comment parler de multiculturalisme quand il n’y a plus de cultures ? » Adresse : Auditorium du Pôle des langues et civilisations65 rue des grands moulins75013 ParisAccès : Métro : 14 RER : C arrêt Bibliothèque François MitterandBus : 27, 62, 64, 89, 132, 325

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MIDA/ENIS Spring School 2020

Appels étudiants - Mercredi 25 décembre 2019 - 23:00The Innovative Training Network  “Mediating Islam in the Digital Age” (MIDA) and the European Network for Islamic Studies (ENIS)organise theMIDA/ENIS  Spring School 2020, Catania, ItalyContesting authority: knowledge, power and expressions of selfhoodDate: Monday 2nd - 8th of March 2020Venue: Catania, SicilyPremises: Università degli Studi di Catania, Palazzo Pedagaggi, Via Vittorio Emanuele II 49, 95131 Catania, Sicily (Italy)Application deadline: Wednesday, 25th of December 2019 Theme: Contesting authority: knowledge, power and expressions of selfhoodThe ENIS Spring School 2020 addresses two closely interrelated aspects of Islam in the digital age. Firstly, how (past and contemporary) technological revolutions have informed the performance of selfhood (including gender), the modes of engagement with society, and the political consequences of shifting boundaries between public and private spheres. Secondly, it addresses the construction and transformation of religious authority and religious knowledge production, and concomitant questions of legitimacy, power and discipline, under changing circumstances.Presently there is a mushrooming of YouTube channels presenting testimonials and life accounts, face book pages providing space for minority groups (e.g. homosexuals or ex-Muslims) that publicise previous hidden aspects of identity, as well as blogs and homemade videos communicating everyday life events or short clips showing artistic performance in an affordable non-celebrity style sharing them with a wide audience. Quite often they contain an (implicit) political statement about the societies in which the expressions are uttered, not only in the message but also in the mere fact of the utterance.(Young) people in the Muslim world, like elsewhere, share more and more aspects of self, including more intimate and previously hidden ones, or experiences with ‘illegality’. These new digital forms of self-expression also entail a claim to space for individualised selfhood. Out of sight of different regimes of surveillance, forms of marginality, secret lives and intimate experiences take on a more public form. With that it questions dominant forms of authority, whether parental, communal, religious or political. The Muslim / Arab world is usually characterised as stressing communal or relational forms of identities and putting less emphasis on individualised selfhood in comparison to the West. The Arab Uprisings first seemed to overturn some deeply rooted forms of authority, including with respect to political power, but now long-established authoritarian forms of power with their different nuances appear to be square back. Yet several observers notice a ‘silent revolution’ taking place on an individual level, asserting individual selfhood and rights. Do these new forms of self-narratives and artistic performances offer us insight into the development of new forms of selfhood?  What are the most important characteristics and expressive forms of these new forms of selfhood? What are the potential political consequences of new forms of self-understanding and expression?Issues of selfhood and artistic performance are closely linked to questions of legitimacy, power and discipline. Muslims have held varying, sometimes conflicting, views on the extent to which knowledge and authority are exclusive of a single figure, a masculine ‘professional’ group, or distributed in society, how knowledge should be transmitted and controlled, and the literary forms that it should take, and how it should be reproduced.The widely held assumption that in the pre-digital era Islamic reasoning was a collective matter of established scholars and theology-centred argumentation lacks historical pedigree. The individual as a political subject emerged centuries before the dawn of digital technology. This also questions the assumption that religious authority was uncontested, only to be challenged very recently by the same technological innovations. Questioning ‘established’ religious authorities and addressing new audiences is as old as Islam. The invention of paper, the rise of literacy and the emergence of ‘calligraphic states’, and not least the spread of print technology have had profound influence on authority and knowledge production, but also generated new expressions of selfhood. Digitisation has intensified this process in an unprecedented way, resulting in the rise of new intellectuals, the feminisation of contestation, the ‘democratisation’ of knowledge production, the emergence of new audiences and discursive communities, the relocation, subjectivation, and fragmentation of authority, but also in new forms of community building, online and offline. Finally, digitisation also prompted ‘established’ religious authorities to reflect upon these newly arising challenges and how to effectively cope with them.The organisers of the MIDA/ENIS Springschool 2020 invite researchers to reflect on these issues from the perspective of their own research and present their work. In order to enhance historical comparison and analytical depth, we very explicitly call not only on researchers working on contemporary issues, but also those who deal with Islam in the past. Requirements for applicationsPhD candidate students and advanced MA students, whose research focuses on this topic without limitation to Islamic societies or Islam, are invited to apply for participation.Please note:Candidates enrolled at French and Spanish universities are invited to apply at IISMMCandidates enrolled in Italian universities are invited to apply at SeSaMOCandidates enrolled in Dutch universities are invited to apply at NISISCandidates enrolled in German universities are invited to apply at the CNMSCandidates enrolled in other universities than the ones mentioned are requested to apply at one of the four institutions only.It is mandatory to specify in the application: Application Springschool 2020Successful applicants may receive some funding from the Selection Committee. Scientific CommitteeProf. Pascal Buresi (CNRS, EHESS-IISMM)Prof. Albrecht Fuess (CNMS/University of Marburg)Maike Neufend (CNMS/University of Marburg)Dr. Jens Heibach (German Institute of Global and Areas Studies, and Marburg University)Prof. Christian Lange (Director NISIS)Dr. Pénélope Larzillière (IRD)Prof. Daniela Melfa (SeSaMO president, University of Catania)Prof. Karin van Nieuwkerk (Radboud University Nijmegen)Prof. Thijl Sunier (Stichting VU)Prof. Gerard Wiegers (UvA) Applications must include the following:a CVa motivation lettera one-page description of your PhD or MA projecta title and an abstract* of 300 words (max.) of your presentation (15 minutes) to be given at the spring schoola short biography* of 50 words (max. in the third person)Please note the following:Successful applicants must arrange their own visa (if applicable), transport and accommodation (except for the participants through IISMM, whose transport and accommodation will be taken care of). About MIDAThe MIDA-project rests on the premise that technological innovations today and in the past have had a tremendous and unprecedented influence on Islam: on the modes of expression and communication of religious messages and traditions, and on the modes of engagement with society, and ultimately also on religious doctrines. In short, they have unleashed forces that have ultimately changed the face of religion This holds true as much for contemporary digitisation as for previous technological transformations. Instead of singling out one specific technological landmark as unique, subsequent innovations and transformations must be brought together into one analytical frame.About ENISENIS (European Network for Islamic Studies) stems from the collaboration of various European academic institutions: NISIS (the Netherlands Interuniversity School for Islamic Studies), IISMM (l’Institut d’études de l’Islam et des sociétés du monde musulman), CSIC (Consejo superior de investigaciones científicas), Philipps-University of Marburg, and SeSaMO (Società Italiana di Studi sul Medio Oriente). *If your application is successful these will be used in the digital program booklet.  

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Appel à candidatures 2020 - Prix Michel Seurat

Appels étudiants - Mardi 14 avril 2020 - 00:00Le Prix Michel Seurat a été institué par le CNRS en juin 1988 pour « honorer la mémoire de ce chercheur du CNRS, spécialiste des questions islamiques, disparu dans des conditions tragiques. Ce programme vise à aider financièrement chaque année un jeu (...)(...)

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Images et imaginaires au Moyen-Orient et en Afrique du Nord

Colloque - Lundi 2 mars 2020 - 09:30Depuis les années 2000, et en particulier à partir des « révolutions arabes » de 2011, les régions du Maghreb et du Moyen-Orient ont connu une explosion d’images. La démultiplication des écrans et des caméras au centre des révoltes en est un exemple significat (...)(...)

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État de guerre, États en guerre XIXe-XXIe siècles

Colloque - Jeudi 16 janvier 2020 - 09:30Colloque organisé conjointement par le Réseau de recherche interdisciplinaire Colonisations et Décolonisations (RICODE), l’Académie des sciences d’outre-mer (ASOM), l’Institut d'études de l'Islam et des sociétés du monde musulman (IISMM), le Centre de Rech (...)(...)

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